Women and the Spirit of the New Deal

Contributions made by women of the New Deal era profoundly reshaped the relationship between the government and American citizens.

Women and the Spirit of the New Deal, published collectively by the National New Deal Preservation Association, the Frances Perkins Center and the Living New Deal is a narrative which highlights the extensive role of 100 women in the programs and operations begun during the 1930’s administration of President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Woman and the Spirit of the New Deal cover image
100 women who contributed to the transformation of American during the Great Depression and FDR’s New Deal. Photo by Susan Ives Communications

Images and brief biographies include politicians, administrators, lawyers, social workers, authors, journalists, painters, sculptors, musicians, secretaries, national park rangers, clerks and scientists.

Some individuals were known to the public during the Great Depression era,  1933-1945, and remembered by historians. While others operated behind the scenes and have been virtually forgotten.  Most played significant roles in the numerous agencies, projects and New Deal programs of the federal government during a time of great adversity.

To better understand New Deal history  the contributions made by these woman must be acknowledge. Through their efforts, big and small, they collectively and profoundly reshaped the relationship between the government and American citizens.

We owe them a debt of gratitude and recognition.

Available through Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Ingram and many other online retailers.

 

 

Frank Cassara – Last of the New Deal CCC artists

During the Great Depression persistence and talent earned Frank Cassara a young, untried artist his place among the greats in New Deal art history.

The last of the New Deal Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) artists, Frank (Francesco) Cassara, born March 13, 1913 in Partinico, Sicily died January 13, 2017, in Ann Arbor, Michigan – two months shy of his 104th birthday.

Frank Cassara CCC artist 2010
During a September 2010 interview Frank Cassara, a former CCC and WPA artist, graciously shared recollections of his New Deal assignments. ©2010 Kathleen Duxbury.    All Rights Reserved

In the fall of 2010, Frank Cassara and his daughter, Francisca, graciously welcomed me into his Michigan home and studio. While giving me directions they voiced concerns with traffic I might encounter en-route; a football game was scheduled at the University of Michigan. If there was traffic I never noticed, but do recall the Spartans were not the only winners that weekend.

Frank was then 97 years old, in a wheelchair, soft spoken and was quietly reflective as I questioned him about his time and special circumstances as an Artist/Enrollee with the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) in Illinois during the Great Depression years.

Initially we sat in the living room of his home. Frank watched as I arranged my papers, camera equipment and hooked up the audio recorder all while explaining the who and whys of our New Deal research, extensive travels and how we search for CCC art, artists and stories.

Frank apologized for what he believed would be unproductive time and wasted travel for me; explaining it had been years (authors note – 75+ years) since his assignment to a CCC camp and he really couldn’t remember much.

Truthfully, I didn’t know what to expect as I handed Frank copies of CCC camp photographs and letters. The documents were dated 1934 – 1935, years when Frank was 21 years of age, living in Detroit, Michigan and desperate for work. He was writing or approaching anyone or any agency he thought might be of assistance, repeatedly.

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